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CYCLONE

The valley fill can be seen just south of Route 10 as you drive down the mountain from Oceana towards Cyclone. It's small as valley fills go, and green with recent reclamation. There's a wide channel of rocks down the left side, which didn't erode in the heavy rains. In fact, a man who lives just below the valley fill believes it kept the flood from being worse--yet something did make the tiny creek overflow like it never had before.

The high water tore at least three feet of the creek bank out of his lawn. He wondered how much wider the creek would become in the next storm.

Though there was no erosion from the tiny stream leading off the valley fill, the creek coming out the hollow was brown and muddy. Just a quarter mile up the hollow, the source of the runoff came into view.

A tiny stream off the hill below the mine had turned into a roaring river during the storms, washing out rocks and dirt. Though I did not walk up the mountain, the nature of the washout seemed to come from some land clearing or slope alteration near the top of the mountain.

Driving over the mountain from Oceana to Cyclone, I saw another kind of runoff pattern that channeled additional water to both sides of the mountain. Roads for two mines at the top of the mountain drained onto Route 10. One went towards Cyclone, the other to Oceana. Since I drove over the mountain at the start of the storm on Saturday, June 13, I saw the water running off both mines.

Runoff from this old mine road drains to Cyclone.

Runoff from this mine road drains to Oceana.